Tag Archives: Respect

CPV Conference Season!

I do love a good coincidence! It seems we are in CPV conference season at the moment, just as the political parties get going on theirs, but more impressively, the themes that are emerging for me resonate from one event to the next.

I attended the Break4Change Annual Network Event in Brighton in September, and one of the key themes of the day was the need for collaboration across services in the delivery of support for families experiencing child to parent violence. Ideally, this was seen as taking place in a multi-disciplinary project, such as B4C Brighton where Children’s Services, the Youth Offending Service, Rise (domestic abuse) and AudioActive (an arts and media charity) not only work together on a day-to-day basis but are all represented on the Steering Group. More particularly to this project, it was considered that it should be embedded in the local authority in order to be delivered effectively. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under conference report, Discussion

Child to parent violence and abuse: new thinking and approaches

The field of child to parent violence and abuse is a rapidly changing one, as new learning and understanding emerges to challenge our way of thinking and service delivery. This makes it an exciting field in which to be working – but also requires us to be on the ball with new research and training opportunities. This last year has seen important work from Dr Hannah Bows into parricide and eldercide; and more findings from a survey of parents by Dr Wendy Thorley and Al Coates, including a challenge to the definition currently in use. Have we got it wrong when we draw distinctions between children, young people and adults in the use of violence towards parents? Should we be using different approaches where children have a diagnosis of ASD or ADHD? Is this a different thing all together, or are there huge overlaps within the community of young people using violence and abuse in the home? Should we be representing this with a giant Venn diagram? Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Announcements

Assuring the quality of training opportunities

A few years ago the sorts of training opportunities available for practitioners and parents / carers (in the UK) around child to parent violence were confined to Local Authority organised days, a small number of agencies with developed expertise, and projects such as the Daphne RCPV work. Whether you could access anything easily was very dependent on where you were in the country – both in terms of accessibility and in having the costs covered. Models of work are varied and it was sometimes difficult to find training which reflected your own approach. In the last year there has definitely been an upsurge in training opportunities advertised – which is good news for those who want to know more, but it brings its own issues. Can you be sure the provider is qualified to deliver the training? Will you be properly equipped at the end to practise the skills – whether in your home or at work? Are the techniques and models promoted safe? Will the training be recognised by funders? Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Training opportunities

The Map Goes Live!

For several years I have been living with the hope that it would be possible to map all the specialist provision around the country for families experiencing violence and abuse from their children. I suppose initially my reasoning was all a bit vague: I suspected there was more work going on than we knew about, but I rather hoped that it would be a way of connecting people and also make my life easier when people contacted me (as they did me and others on a regular basis) asking for help in knowing where to turn.

Over the course of the two years it’s taken to reach this point, the rationale has become more formalised, and a fantastic steering group has supported the work as it transformed into a “proper project” with money and everything. I am now 5 months in to what was originally envisaged as 6 months worth of work. The reality is that it will carry on for a few more months in order to chase up the remaining projects we know about and complete final reports, but the time has come to launch the map. If not now, when!

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.34.40

(screenshot only, see below to access the map)

The software package used at the moment, Community 21, is part of a separate project within Brighton University (CUPP). Using the map you will be able to locate a specialist service by area, or name; and to learn about the model of work offered, methods of referral and any evaluation that as taken place. You will see if anyone can refer or whether it is a service offered internally; any age criteria, and whether the project works with young people only, parents only or both.

So what is it for?

Well, this is the current thinking:

  • The map will help families and practitioners looking for a service in their area.
  • The map will enable agencies to network, whether in the development or coordination of services.
  • The map will enable agencies and practitioners to locate projects which can offer training.
  • The map will enable commissioners to understand the gaps in provision and to look at the development of services strategically.
  • Other interested parties will have a fuller picture of what is going on.

What it won’t do:

  • There is as yet no method of assessing standards of work or quality assurance. Those using the map should understand that it merely indicates the presence of a service and we cannot officially endorse any project.
  • We have not as yet figured a way of including services that are offered in a different way, for example telephone support from national agencies.
  • It does not yet include individual practitioners / counselors offering a service to families.
  • It isn’t 100% comprehensive. At the moment it only covers England and Wales. I know there are services still not included!

How does it Work?

Simply follow this link to the page which shows our project. You will find “our map” and then some information about the project and the people involved. You can zoom in and out on the map to see different parts of England and Wales, and you can do some basic searches by the type and name of the service. Click on the different coloured ‘hexes’ to see a project in detail. The twitter feed @mapping_cpv is there too.

There is still some way to go. The next few months will be spent following up existing leads, and scoping new ones as always. Much of this work takes place through contacts passing on names of colleagues, so all contributions are very welcome. A big question remains as to how to keep the information up to date and relevant. This is particularly an issue when so many services face massive budget cuts or regular renewal of charitable funding.

But finally, we are interested in feedback. If you are able to take a moment to look at the map we would be pleased to hear any comments you have, especially:

  • Would it be useful to you?
  • In what way particularly?
  • Can you immediately identify any issues or changes we could make?
  • Can you suggest ways of building on what is already there?
  • Do you have a service that is not yet included?

I cannot end this without a huge vote of thanks to the wonderful Steering Group, which comprises: Dr. Paula Wilcox from University of Brighton, Jo Sharpen of AVA, Dunston Patterson from the YJB, and Julia Worms of Respect. Regular updates will continue as the project completes and reports become available.

2 Comments

Filed under projects

Respect National Practitioners’ Day

Respect seminar flyer

 

The 10th Respect National Practitioners Seminar  took place in London last week.

In the morning we were treated to an excellent presentation from Carlene Firmin on her research into peer on peer abuse. Unlike the other presentations, Carlene’s will not be available on the Respect website as the research is still ongoing, but much of her work can be found on her own website, MsUnderstood.  There were many points at which she could have been talking about child to parent violence – so many cross overs. I will have to give this some more thought, but to be going on with:

  • Peer on peer abuse straddles many different concepts and fields and so remains hidden.
  • The importance and power of friendship groups as young people move into adolescence.
  • The offer of parenting programmes because that is what is available rather than making a proper assessment of need.
  • The problems that arise when violence becomes normalised.
  • Limitations to changing individuals without wider social change.
  • Issues around child protection and safeguarding.

The overall tone was optimistic however. As we learn more we have more opportunities to intervene earlier. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under conference report

Kate Iwi talks about restorative justice in parent abuse work

Marking International Restorative Justice Week in November, this YouTube video was posted by IARS. In it, Kate Iwi, of Respect UK, talks about an innovative restorative technique being pioneered as part of the Respect Young People’s Programme. Restorative work is a fundamental aspect of work with families experiencing children’s violence to parents.

 

1 Comment

Filed under projects

The Respect Young People’s Programme: one year in.

The Respect Young People’s Programme (RYPP) has been running for just over a year now, and so it seemed like a good time to catch up with the director of the programme to hear how it’s been going. RYPP is an intervention for 10-16 year olds and their parents where the young person has used violence or aggressive behaviour towards a parent. Many thanks to Neil Blacklock of Respect, who has written this End of Year Report, with especial attention to lessons learnt. I was particularly interested to read about the management and organisational lessons, as this is an area which we do not address so often.  Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under projects