Tag Archives: Parent abuse

Kate Iwi talks about restorative justice in parent abuse work

Marking International Restorative Justice Week in November, this YouTube video was posted by IARS. In it, Kate Iwi, of Respect UK, talks about an innovative restorative technique being pioneered as part of the Respect Young People’s Programme. Restorative work is a fundamental aspect of work with families experiencing children’s violence to parents.

 

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Parent abuse: Looking back over the last ten years.

The folks at the Adolescent to Parent Violence project based in Oxford, which reported in 2013, have recently been having an overhaul of their website. The plan is to feature regular guest bloggers and I was privileged to be asked to write the first post. You can see catch it here: Looking back over 10 years of work in the field of Parent Abuse.

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Parent Abuse: Engaging with Social Workers

CAADA tweet

 

The CAADA tweet posted yesterday referred to intimate partner violence, but it doesn’t take long on message boards to find similar concerns around the reporting of child to parent violence: parents reluctant to seek help from Children’s Services because of a belief that the response will be that they are failing to protect  their other children. No prizes for guessing what happens next.

As a social worker myself, I am deeply troubled by the narrative; but also concerned because social workers that I meet at conferences or at work tell me that they DO know about parent abuse, and that they desperately want to help if only there were more resources. What is it that happens at that point of disconnection? Continue reading

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Understanding parent abuse within a child protection framework

We hear a lot about the cross-over between domestic abuse and child to parent violence (CPV), but significantly less about how CPV is to be understood within a child abuse and protection framework. This is an area of work dear to my own heart, and one that has also been the focus of some research in the Netherlands. Recently Dutch researcher, Dr Remy Vink, was tweeting about a conference she had attended, and she kindly agreed to be interviewed about it for the blog.

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Adolescent Violence in the Home: Believe the Impossible!

In July I posted details of a newly published book about adolescence violence in the home from Gregg Routt and Lily Anderson. Rather belatedly, I am really pleased now to offer a review for those who have not yet had time to read their own copy.

When considering the abuse that human beings heap on one another, it can sometimes seem that we are being required to believe “as many as six impossible things before breakfast”*; and, for many people, the notion of children abusing their parents falls neatly into this category. One of the things that make the excellent new book by Routt and Anderson so accessible is the frequent use of case studies to illustrate a point, whether to further understanding of an aspect of abuse, or to demonstrate the detail of the programme they have developed. By including this level of illustration they make an important contribution to believing the impossible: Yes, this happens, and this is what it looks like, but change is possible. Continue reading

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More news about “My Violent Child”

The June screening of the Channel 5 documentary My Violent Child, which attracted over 1.5 million viewers (available here till June 2015), stirred up some very mixed feelings. There is evidence (comments to Channel 5) that many families found it helpful in showing something of what they were themselves experiencing, thus validating their concerns and fears around living with violent teens. The Southampton practitioner and team featured have received many referrals and have developed their work further as a result. Yet other practitioners were seriously concerned by the possible effects of filming vulnerable young people, including graphic footage of their violent and abusive behaviour, as well as the shortage of positive, constructive answers for families shown in the film. I have blogged about this previously here. Continue reading

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An interview with Jane Evans, Parenting Specialist

I have been privileged to interview a number of researchers and  practitioners for this blog, and am pleased today to be able to bring you this interview with Jane Evans.

I first met Jane on twitter, and then caught up with her properly at a conference on Adolescent Violence to Parents in Oxford last September. I knew her at that time for her work in the field of parenting, and specifically post-domestic violence: encouraging a greater awareness of the needs of children to be raised with kindness and compassion. Jane works as an independent trauma parenting specialist and trainer, and has won many plaudits for her book “How are you feeling today Baby Bear?” designed to help young children who have been living in ‘a stormy house’ explore their feelings.

Recently Jane’s work has broadened out to include the field of parent abuse; and I was interested to hear how she had made this transition. Continue reading

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Video resources: understanding behaviour

I have recently come across the following resources, that may be of interest or use in work with parent abuse.

With Meerkat Brain, Jane Evans offers an easily digestible explanation of the neuroscience of why individuals are not always able to respond to instruction or reproof, and why traumatised children will need particular understanding and care. This is one of a number of similar models of brain operation, but one that people are reporting to be especially helpful.

Secondly, This video will change you in exactly 60 seconds, from BVC Network with thanks to Laurie Reid who brought it to my attention. Clearly there are many influences in a child’s life and no straightforward causal link between parent and child opinions or behaviour, but anyone who has watched a child teetering on high heels, following round with a dustpan and brush, or picking up a briefcase to head off “to work”, will attest to the power of imitation. Furthermore, previous exposure to, or the witnessing of, domestic violence is known to be the most frequent single issue in the background of families where children are violent to parents.

I’ll take the opportunity to link again to an animation from AVITH, which gives a very accessible overview of adolescent violence in the home for use with parents particularly, but would be helpful for anyone wanting to learn more. The film was made for use in Australia so the final advice may not be directly applicable to other situations. You can download it on the front page of the website.

Please do comment with other video resources which you have found and would like to share as useful in thinking about parent abuse or adolescent violence in the home.

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A family therapy intervention in Portugal

Soon after viewing the Channel 5 documentary last week, I received this paper, from Neusa Patuleia, a clinical psychologist / family therapist in Portugal. (De)constructing Child-to-Parent Violence, discusses a particular therapeutic intervention at a residential establishment in that country. Continue reading

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My Violent Child: the documentary.

First broadcast 18th June 2014 on Channel 5. Available until 13 June 2015

There has been a very mixed response to the documentary about child to parent violence screened on Channel 5 on Wednesday June 18th.

The programme followed three families from around the country, with boys ranging in age from 7 – 14 years. In each case the child had been physically and verbally abusive to his mother for many years and also, in some cases, to other members of the family or within school. The violence was extreme – and graphically depicted – including punching, kicking and hair pulling, strangling, property destruction and apparently an incident with a meat cleaver. While each family had found some form of assistance, it was made clear that this remains a problematic issue, with specialist support not easy to find, and at the end while some progress was being made, we were told that Brett’s mother risked losing the respite care that she had found so important. Continue reading

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