Research priorities

I was chatting to someone recently and we were pondering the next direction for research in the field of child to parent violence and abuse. We are not without guidance in this respect. Most reports and papers conclude with recommendations, including further research needed to fill gaps in knowledge and understanding, and in the development of good practice.

Indeed, in the recent rapid literature review for the Domestic Abuse Commissioner’s Office (here and here), Victoria Baker and I made a number of proposals for the way forward, with eight separate research priorities which can be summarised as follows: 1) establishing a nationally agreed terminology, 2) collecting robust data, 3) longitudinal research looking at the long term implications including “cost to society”, 4) a focus on young people’s experiences and perspectives, 5) how the experience and presentation of CPV is affected by the intersection of different identifying factors and situations, 6) high risk cases and those involving sexualised behaviour and abuse, 7) robust examination of context, and 8) the impact of COVID-19 for families and support services.

Also recently, I came across this document from the Victorian Government in Australia, laying out priorities for work in family violence, including adolescent violence in the home (AVITH), with a focus around developing a deeper understanding regarding the drivers and types of adolescent family violence and effective responses. Importantly here, there are questions to be asked about the possibility of better early identification and intervention, the impact on adolescents themselves, as well as new emerging forms of abuse and links with other forms of abusive behaviour.

Compared to where we were ten years ago, we have made huge strides in analysis and understanding; in the collection of data and its use in the development of responses; in exploring motivations and challenging stereotypes. But there is still a long way to go, and significant gaps remain in the way we have examined this issue. Thankfully there is also hugely more work taking place in this field, in the UK and across the world.

There are currently 2 requests for help with research in the UK that I am aware of. Giulia Pintus at Middlesex University, hopes to find 2 more participants for her work with mothers of children aged 6 – 12, expressing aggressive behaviour towards them; and Anu Adebogun at Oxford University has just started recruiting for her important work with black mothers experiencing “difficult, abusive or violent behaviour” from their child or adolescent. If you can help by passing on the information in these requests, I am sure the researchers would be immensely grateful.

If you are engaged in research in this field and would like your work to be included on the Research page of this website, you are welcome to contact me.

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